Technical Aids Tips and Tricks XXXIX

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Some wheelchair users proudly claim to have a

“standing wheelchair”

paid by their health insurance. This would be so great, you could be standing again in your favourite pub at the bar to have a drink, and you would be able to get a coffee mug from above out of the cupboard without problems.

All this might be correct, but the question is, did the ‚Äústanding wheelchair‚ÄĚ get a medical device¬†number for this ?

Everybody should be clear that coffee mug transportation from the cupboard and “standing elimination” of draught beer in general don’t belong to primary health care, therefore the public health insurance would cover the costs only in exceptional cases.
Furthermore the insurance would have paid already for an everyday wheelchair for sure with which you can also get drunk. So why a second…

I am outing myself, I have such a chair, and it is medically reasonable!!!
But officially it is not a standing wheelchair, but a

Standing chair or Standing exercise device

I repeat again, why should the insurance pay for two wheelchairs…

Everybody knows it, you were lying in bed with the flu for 3 days, and when getting up you see little stars first because you feel dizzy.
After my accident I have looked at the ceiling in hospital for 9 weeks and claim since then that I knew all shades of white.
During 8 months I was buckled up each day for 1 hour on a tilt table and tilted upwards as on a torture rack to permanently stabilise my circulation without additional medication.
Furthermore the standing chair helps to prevent muscle wasting and pressure sores.

After I was home also my tilt table was gone. My circulation was not happy at all with that. Although we para- and quadriplegics are famous for our low blood pressure… with a blood pressure of 42/35 I could still count the drops of my medicine… this was hard. I got a prescription especially for a standing chair, because my blood pressure refused another standing device comparable to a speaker’s desk.
It is incomprehensible, but when using these “standing desks” I felt close to fainting after seconds.

After testing of another device and longer correspondence with my insurance, roundabout a year, which was very fast, I got a

Standing exercise device

l

(ca. 7000‚ā¨) approved.

Read my blogpost about a handrail (back at the wall) as transfer aid (see older blogpost), from everyday wheelchair to standing chair.

At this point I would like to personally thank all these blithering idiots because of whom the approval of these upscale medical device at the health insurance is understandably so difficult.
If you absolutely want to “stand” at your pub’s bar, buy your standing wheelchair by yourself!!!

Small tip, even if you are not so educated in using a language. In case of non-approval of a medical device¬†by the health insurance consider correct wording and spelling in your objection. Otherwise the correspondence can drag on for years…

I know a case in which the insurance wanted to place an electrical standing wheelchair in re-use which is 10 km/h fast into the living room of a patient in the 1st floor.
This is somehow unusual, but medically absolutely justifiable.

Translator BL

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2 Responses to “Technical Aids Tips and Tricks XXXIX”

  1. Kurt says:

    Ich denke ein volkommen neues Lebensgef√ľhl oder ?

  2. Simon says:

    Ich habe auch einen. Den LSA von Permobil. Preis sagenhafte 9.000 Euro (jetzt wird er noch hochpreisiger da er Umgebaut werden muss da sich mein Behinderungsbild verschlechtert) Er wurde mir kein halbes Jahr nach meinem neuen Aktivrolli genehmigt (habe keine Tetraplegie sondern eine schwere Tetraspastik)

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